Fancy a Christmas and craft shopping outing to Bath?

A Yarn Story collage

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ribbons from country threads Wool at Wool in Bath Yarn-y display at A Yarn Story

Recognising that many of our members are multi-craftual and appreciative of other crafty things, today’s post is about a one-day trip from London to Bath to visit the city’s famous Christmas Market on Saturday, 29 November.

The event has been planned by Yarn in the City, organisers of annual knitting celebration The Great London Yarn Crawl. Consider it an opportunity for a day away before the craziness of December is truly here, but spend it productively getting a jump on your Christmas shopping too! It’s also a lovely outing to make with special stitch friends.

What can you expect on the day?

Everyone will meet at Hammersmith at 9:00am. It’s wheels up by 9:15am as you’re whisked comfortably by coach towards Bath making new friends and perhaps knitting or hand-stitching along the way.

Just outside Bath is the coach’s first stop – The Shed. A former cidery, The Shed is now home to a farm shop and deli, bistro and café, as well as spa, gallery, and gift boutiques. The Shed will have a Christmas Market happening during the visit and knitters and crafters alike will be want to visit A Yarn Story, Bath’s newest yarn shop which will be offering a 10% discount to participants on the day. A Yarn Story has a luxurious selection of yarns from around the world as well as the UK including Shibui Knits, SweetGeorgia Yarns, Malabrigo, Kettle Yarn Co., Hedgehog Fibres, The Uncommon Thread, and more – as well as knit-inspired gift items too.

After a quick visit it’s back on the coach to the centre of Bath where Yarn in the City guests will be dropped off at the Bath Christmas Market in front of the Bath Abbey. The rest of the afternoon is free to explore at your own pace, either individually or in small groups.

The Bath Christmas Market is the UK’s favourite Christmas market with over 180 chalets of crafts and artisan products, all carefully selected for their local focus. A map with details of all the stalls and artisans will be provided.

A short walk away from the Christmas Market is Country Threads, a charming quilt shop with a huge stock of cotton fabrics, French ribbons, tools, books, waddings and threads. They also have jelly rolls and charm packs – the whole place is packed with inspiration!

The end of the day wraps up at Wool, a small yarn shop opposite Country Threads. A private event is planned for 5:30pm when the shop closes and will include festive beverages and treats for all before heading back to the market to meet the coach, and homeward bound for London. The coach is expected back at Hammersmith at approximately 9:30pm.

Tickets are available for £28. For more details and to book tickets, visit http://www.yarninthecity.com/events.

Priory Square launch party

Annie of the Village Haberdashery is having a launch party at the shop for Katy Jones for her new fabric collection, Priory Square, on Sunday, 14 December at 2pm. Katy’s collection will finally be in stock and because this event takes place during their Anniversary Sale weekend, they will be offering 20% off everything in the shop (in store only) that weekend. You can read more details on The Daily Stitch.

Please let Annie know if you’d like to go so she can keep count for food/beverage needs.
katy jones priory square
photo 2 annie
photo 1 annie

October Makes

Post by MetroQuilter

This month’s meeting and guild flickr group had a lot of mini quilts on display. Some of the minis are for swaps, some for charity quilts and some to try new styles. Minis are a great way to experiment with new techniques and ideas without having to commit to a large quilt.

More Christmas stockings were also popping up; the group are donating the stockings to St Thomas’s hospital for the families of babies in the Intensive Care Unit. Anybody who would like to help should check out previous posts for details.

october makes

Christmas Charity Stocking

The guild is currently making stockings for the families of babies in St Thomas’ Hospital intensive care unit. The stockings will be filled with goodies for the parents and babies.

If you are interested in helping us please get in touch and we can pass on the details of size and where to send them to.

Stockings will not be placed in the cots/incubators so we do not need such strict fabric/wadding rules as are normal with babies. However, please do not put any buttons or embellishments on them. Any colour scheme is fine, you don’t have to stick to Christmas colours!

Please feel free to make as many as you wish, any extras can be distributed to another ward. But we do need them by early December.

The Charity and Chaplaincy at Guy’s and St Thomas’ are thrilled to have us on board for this.

Book Review: Urban and Amish

URBAN and AMISH
Classic Quilts and Modern Updates

MYRA HARDER

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Review by Kat Cottington

I am an avid reader (and purchaser) of books to feed my passion which is patchwork and quilting.

I am experienced and usually like to do my own thing but a few months ago I joined the LMQG as I liked the fresh look of the quilts I had seen. However, I have found it difficult to get my head around altering traditional blocks to give them an up-to-date spin and then I was asked to review this book.

The greatest part of this book is that it shows traditional and modern takes together and helps to open your eyes to the possibilities that a few alterations can make. Of course once you get this you can change things even further to make them your own.
The instructions for both traditional and modern are well written and clear. The photography is very good and I really like the descriptions for the quilting which is lacking in a lot of publications.
The only thing I would really criticise is that the basting is limited to the use of safety pins as there are other options available, namely thread basting by hand, basting by machine using soluble thread and, my favourite, spray basting.

Luke Haynes | “Quilt; as quilt, as art”

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Luke Haynes visited the LMQG at our habitual meeting place the Star Tavern, Belgravia, on 12th on the October 2014. He brought with him stories, perspectives, bales of ideas that would shame the even his “Goodwill” fabric hunting grounds, and of course quilts. As quilts. And quilts as quilts, as art.
IMG_4878Luke loved Purple. Purple was made for him by his mother and was perhaps the beginning other visual and creative interests. One theory has it that he has been remaking Purple all his life. If that is the case, he has done the most challenging of all creative things. He has allowed his creations to change his outlook, he has engaged in what they mean to others. In his words, he “has a conversation about it”.
luke haynes quilt backLuke trained in art and architecture and at the same time, pursued what was at once a distraction and an alternative, photography. These threads came together in quilting.

At an early exhibition Luke found himself to be the subject of an unexpected celebration;

“I LOVE how you don’t care if it is straight!”

He does not bind by hand, he uses the visibility of the seams as part of the framing of the quilt. He does use acid free glue.  He does not do that which he doesn’t want to do. All very affirmative for a room full of modern quilters!
luke haynes close upOther than steering clear of knitted fabric (there is a limit to the contemporary edge that even Luke can construct out of some material), Luke will try fabrics together that seem unlikely neighbours, shirting with synthetic fur, cotton labels with wool suiting, vinyl with denim….He sorts his Goodwill, by the kilo, purchases by colour. He doesn’t dye fabrics, he reconstructs them as they are. His editing is based on whether he would like to wear it. If yes, it is spared the rotary cutter. Until the next wardrobe cull. If not, curtains. And they might well be.
IMG_4890Luke’s work is a synthesis of different perspectives. Log cabins are suggested, and the lines deconstructed, the blocks don’t match the frames, they echo them. They stimulate inquiry, they disturb familiarity.
luke haynes cupcakePhotographs are photoshopped and reimaged in fabric, into portrait quilts. The fellowship of quilting’s heritage realised anew. The reverse of the quilt holds the negative image that the electronic photographs never had, picked out in a contrasting bobbin colour. Joe Cunningham’s signature “drawing with bias tape” has the same stature and space on the quilt as Joe’s image. The work of the long arm quilting machine becomes the earliest of craft methods, ink sketched onto a background.

In another portrait quilt, Whistler’s Mother becomes “a big bearded goofy guy” and as with Mrs Whistler, the physical map of a journey through life, patent on the face, present in the textures of the portrait quilt. Ambiguity brings questions. Is he care worn and tired a contemporary Whistler whose digital bubble has burst? Has he simply had a heavy meal and a night of video games?
IMG_4886Are we looking at the weight of the world or the passing effects of self indulgence? We are stimulated to ask the question, provoked to debate the response. Isn’t that what art does? And speaking history, across generations, in fabric, the maker evident in their sewing, isn’t that what quilting has done?
luke haynes longarm quiltingThe accessibility of Luke’s portrait quilts makes them the “pictures on a blanket” of the cautious Seattle art gallery visitors he told us about. They are objects for use, they are personal, they are public. They are quilts, as quilts. They are quilts; as quilts, as art.

Inspiration of the month

Improvisational piecing is a technique that is at home in traditional quilting (think Quilter of Gee’s  Bend) as it is in modern quilting.

For our inspirational feature for this month we’d like to share a wonderful modern improvisational quilt that was constructed by Lu Summers in 2012 and I believe was ultimately the foundation for her book on improvisational piecing that was published in 2013.

 

There are literally no limits to improv piecing. You can strip it down to just a pair of scissors and thread or combine many techniques and still machine piece. The endless possibilities also makes it for many a quilter daunting although most do find it in the end quite liberating.

 

During the making of this quilt Lu often had doubts and I believe it was a bit of a roller coaster ride that in the end turned into a colourful and striking quilt that provides with every new viewing always something new to focus on.

Lu runs classes on screen printing and improv piecing at her home in Suffolk.